Tag Archives: Corporation

Jeff Nielson ~ The USA: Worst Government That Money Can Buy

BullionBulls  April 7 2014 (Thanks, Gary)

AbsolutCorruption_politicsHistory tells us that when governments become excessively oppressive and/or descend into saturation corruption (like the rancid regimes of the Western bloc), that such scenarios rarely “end well” – i.e. a peaceful transition back to responsible, legitimate government. Instead, the peasants/serfs/workers are nearly always driven to a state of desperation (generally near-starvation) before they finally pull out their pitchforks and guillotines, and take back their own government.

Obviously, then, the goal of commentators such as myself and other truth-tellers today is to try to reach a large percentage of our own “peasants”, the Sheep who are currently passively lapping-up the daily fiction from our Corporate media propaganda machine, before they devolve to such a state of poverty/desperation. Then once honestly informed, the presumption is that this knowledge would then power peaceful and orderly change via the ballot box.

In turn, we have seen the response of the One Bank to such messages: my own work has been systematically censored from any/all mainstream outlets, and many other alternative “voices” have also been snuffed-out one way or another. But this is only half of the One Bank’s campaign to ensure that the peasants of the United States (in particular) are never well-informed as they head to the ballot-box each election to vote for one half or the other of its own, two-headed political hydra.

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Michael Snyder ~ Corporatism: A System Of Control Designed By The Monopoly Men Of The Global Elite

Corporatism: A System Of Control Designed By The Monopoly Men Of The Global EliteThe Dow is at a record high and so are corporate profits – so why does it feel like most of the country is deeply suffering right now?  Real household income is the lowest that it has been in a decade, poverty is absolutely soaring, 47 million Americans are on food stamps and the middle class is being systematically destroyed.  How can big corporations be doing so well while most American families are having such a hard time?  Isn’t their wealth supposed to “trickle down” to the rest of us?  Unfortunately, that is not how the real world works.  Today, most big corporations are trying to minimize the number of “expensive” American workers on their payrolls as much as they can.  If the big corporation that is employing you can figure out a way to replace you with a worker in China or with a robot, it will probably do it.  Corporations are in existence to maximize wealth for their shareholders, and most of the time the largest corporations are dominated by the monopoly men of the global elite.  Over the decades, the politicians that have their campaigns funded by these monopoly men have rigged the game so that the big corporations are able to easily dominate everything.  But this was never what those that founded this country intended.  America was supposed to be a place where the power of collectivist institutions would be greatly limited, and individuals and small businesses would be free to compete in a capitalist system that would reward anyone that had a good idea and that was willing to work hard.  But today, our economy is completely and totally dominated by a massively bloated federal government and by absolutely gigantic predator corporations that are greatly favored by our massively bloated federal government.  Our founders tried to warn us about the dangers of allowing government, banks and corporations to accumulate too much power, but we didn’t listen.  Now they dominate everything, and the rest of us are fighting for table scraps.

In early America, most states had strict laws governing the size and scope of corporations.  Individuals and small businesses thrived in such an environment, and the United States experienced a period of explosive economic growth.  We showed the rest of the world that capitalism really works, and we eventually built the largest middle class that the world had ever seen.

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Ann Kreilkamp ~ Wall Street: Alexis Goldstein, Who “Drank The Kool-Aid,” After Seven Years, Got Out And Got Real

Exopermaculture | May 2 2012

Goldstein’s colorful description of end-stage capitalism, its intensely competitive, scarcity-based, mendacious, pretentious and, underneath, lonely and terrified charade of “making a (rapacious) living” at the expense of literally everybody else both fascinates and repels.

I’m reminded of the netflix film I watched last night: “The Corporation,” which compared the gradual legal transmogrification of this all-too-human structure — which is not natural, which can and must be either transformed or abolished — to a psychopath, its charter dictating the financial, short-term “bottom line” (for shareholders) as the single overriding value while ignoring ethics, empathy, and responsibility.

Given the way corporations work, how can you be anything but a psychopath and actually succeed on Wall Street? Remember Gordon Gecko’s “Greed Is Good”? — Let’s remove one letter: “Greed is God.”

Read Goldstein’s post here

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No More Corporate Personhood In LA, Unanimous

Deborah Dupre | Human Rights Examiner

Standing room only, unanimous vote against ‘corporate personhood’: Money is not free speech

Thanks to ground work by the U.S. Green Party, the wave of Occupy Wall Street empowerment and Human Rights Alert, today, Los Angeles became the first major U.S. city to vote against corporate personhood and call for a Constitutional Amendment asserting corporations are not entitled to constitutional rights and that money is not free speech. The vote was unanimous.

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Anger Sowing Seeds of a New Consumer Movement

David Sirota | Nation Of Change
November 20 2011

OP-ED | As we all know, America is angry. Really angry. To put it in pop culture terms, we’ve moved from the vaguely inspiring agita of Peter Finch in “Network” to the wild-eyed, primal-scream rage of Sam Kinison in “Back to School.”

When we pay attention to politics, we get peeved at Congress and the presidential candidates. When we tune into sports, we’re annoyed with squabbling players and owners. When we turn on the news, we fume at the smug pundits. And when it comes to the economy, we’re in a tizzy at big corporations.

Most of this indignation is nothing new; it is atavistic fury expressed in the modern vernacular. Yet, one strand of our anger — the kind directed at big business — may be truly novel, as our chagrin is no longer just that ancient animosity toward excessive corporate power. Instead, it has also become a personal disdain toward firms we deal with on a daily basis.

This is the key finding of the latest report from the Center for Services Leadership at Arizona State University. Its findings show that after years of rising anger, consumer rage has reached an all-time high.

Back in 2004, ASU’s researchers theorized that such apoplexy was an outgrowth of affluence. “Households simply have more products and services today, and thus more points of contact, increasing our chances that we will have a problem,” they wrote.

But, of course, 2004 was a comparatively prosperous time. Today, by contrast, recession-battered consumers have access to fewer products and services and yet are angrier at companies, meaning the sentiment likely reflects a response to deeper trends.

One of those is a decline in craftsmanship in the era of free trade and offshore production. With America now awash in foreign wares, we’ve imported the developing world’s lax regulatory standards and, thus, its lower product quality. That means poorly constructed furniture, malfunctioning electronics and all the other shoddiness that drives customers nuts.

Another maddening trend is the corporate sector’s shift from long-term customer care to short-term predation.

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Boulder, CO Votes Corporations Are Not People! Elena Nunez

Thom Hartmann’s Channel | November 2 2011

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